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#1163; An Account of the Offense

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If he had EATEN the hearts, I could at least understand the hunter's mindset -- but he THREW THEM AWAY like it was so much SPORT!!

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irunfrombears
1709 days ago
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1709 days ago
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jlvanderzwan
1709 days ago
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You could probably repeat this for a lot of medical professions..

Raspberry Pi 2 on sale now at $35

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Let’s get the good stuff out of the way above the fold. Raspberry Pi 2 is now on sale for $35 (the same price as the existing Model B+), featuring:

  • A 900MHz quad-core ARM Cortex-A7 CPU (~6x performance)
  • 1GB LPDDR2 SDRAM (2x memory)
  • Complete compatibility with Raspberry Pi 1

Because it has an ARMv7 processor, it can run the full range of ARM GNU/Linux distributions, including Snappy Ubuntu Core, as well as Microsoft Windows 10.

Raspberry Pi 2 Model B

Raspberry Pi 2

BCM2836 and Raspberry Pi 2

Since we launched the original Raspberry Pi Model B, back in 2012, we’ve done an enormous amount of software work to get the best out of our Broadcom BCM2835 application processor and its 700MHz ARM11 CPU. We’ve spent a lot of money on optimising a wide variety of open-source libraries and applications, including WebKit, LibreOffice, Scratch, Pixman, XBMC/Kodi, libav and PyPy. At the same time, the Raspbian project, run by Peter Green and Mike Thompson, has provided us with an ARMv6-compatible rebuild of Debian with hardware floating point support, and Gordon, Dom and Jonathan have spent thousands of hours working on the firmware and board support to make Raspberry Pi the most stable single board computer in the world. It’s worth going back and trying out an old SD card image from 2012 to get an idea of how far we’ve come.

Nonetheless, there comes a point when there’s no substitute for more memory and CPU performance. Our challenge was to figure out how to get this without throwing away our investment in the platform or spoiling all those projects and tutorials which rely on the precise details of the Raspberry Pi hardware. Fortunately for us, Broadcom were willing to step up with a new SoC, BCM2836. This retains all the features of BCM2835, but replaces the single 700MHz ARM11 with a 900MHz quad-core ARM Cortex-A7 complex: everything else remains the same, so there is no painful transition or reduction in stability.

First silicon arrived last year, as we can see in this professionally shot video from bringup night:

Once we were confident that BCM2836 was performing as expected, James designed a series of prototypes, before we settled on the Raspberry Pi 2 Model B that launches today. This has an identical form-factor to the existing Raspberry Pi 1 Model B+, but manages to pack in both the new BCM2836 and a full 1GB of SDRAM from our friends at Micron. All of the connectors are in the same place and have the same functionality, and the board can still be run from a 5V micro-USB power adapter.

Raspberry Pi 2 is available to buy today from our partners element14 and RS Components. Remember you’ll need an updated NOOBS or Raspbian image including an ARMv7 kernel and modules from our downloads page. At launch, we are using the same ARMv6 Raspbian userland on both Raspberry Pi 1 and 2; over the next few months we will investigate whether we can obtain higher performance from regular ARMv7 Debian, or whether we can selectively replace a small number of libraries to get the best of both worlds. Now that we’re using an ARMv7 core, we can also run Ubuntu: a Snappy Ubuntu Core image is available now and a package for NOOBS will be available in the next couple of weeks.

Windows 10

For the last six months we’ve been working closely with Microsoft to bring the forthcoming Windows 10 to Raspberry Pi 2. Microsoft will have much more to share over the coming months. The Raspberry Pi 2-compatible version of Windows 10 will be available free of charge to makers.

Visit WindowsOnDevices.com today to join the Windows Developer Program for IoT and receive updates as they become available.

FAQs

We’ll keep updating this list over the next couple of days, but here are a few to get you started.

Are you discontinuing the Raspberry Pi 1 Model B and B+?

No. We have a lot of industrial customers who will want to stick with Raspberry Pi 1 for the time being. We’ll keep building Raspberry Pi 1 Model B and Model B+ as long as there’s demand for it. Both these boards will continue to sell for $35.

What about Model A+?
Model A+ continues to be the $20 entry-level Raspberry Pi for the time being. Although the new board is called Raspberry Pi 2 Model B, we have no plans to introduce a Raspberry Pi 2 Model A before the end of 2015.

What about the Compute Module?
We expect to introduce a BCM2836-based Compute Module in the medium term, but for now we’re focused on getting Raspberry Pi 2 Model B out of the door.

Are you still using VideoCore?
Yes. VideoCore IV 3d is the only publicly documented 3d graphics core for ARM-based SoCs, and we want to make Raspberry Pi more open over time, not less.

Where does the “6x performance” figure come from?
The speedup varies between applications. We’ve seen single-threaded CPU benchmarks that speed up by as little as 1.5x, while Sunspider is around 4x faster, and NEON-enabled multicore video codecs can be over 20x faster. 6x is a typical figure for a multi-threaded CPU benchmark like SysBench.
Is this a full version of Windows 10?
Please refer to WindowsOnDevices.com.

Credits

A project like this requires a vast amount of focused work from a large team over an extended period. A partial list of those who made major direct contributions to the BCM2836 chip program and Raspberry Pi 2 follows: James Adams, Leo Azevedo, Jonathan Bell, Alex Bradbury, Dom Cobley, Steve Cook, Dave Collins, Phil Elwell, Gordon Hollingworth, Andrew Holme, Tammy Julyan, John Kelly, Walter Kho, Yung-Ching Lee, Gert van Loo, Ian Macaulay, Paul Manser, Simon Martin, Luca Di Mauro, Akshaye Sama, Andrew Scheller, Serge Schneider, Mark Scoones, Shawn Shadburn, Paul Sherry, Mike Stimson, Stuart Thompson, Roger Thornton, Madhu Thottupura, James Turner, Nidhi Varshneya, Andrew West. If you’re not on this list and think you should be, please let me know, and accept my apologies.

If you’re in front of a computer at 9am GMT and for a while after, you can watch us announcing the Raspberry Pi 2 live, and submit questions for us.

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irunfrombears
1950 days ago
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Couldn't come at a better time. I'm about to dive in to Raspberry Pi.
DC
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1951 days ago
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negatendo
1923 days ago
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??? What is this Windows 10 thing though? Lightweight windows is interesting.
Denver
hooges
1951 days ago
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I really need an excuse to buy this new raspberry pi.
Topeka, KS
chrisminett
1951 days ago
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Better, same price. Superb
Milton Keynes, UK
letssurf
1950 days ago
Already ordered :D
jepler
1951 days ago
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I might pick one of these up. It still won't have the specs of the Odroid U3, but the larger Raspberry PI community means stuff will probably all work just a little bit better.
Earth, Sol system, Western spiral arm
DaftDoki
1951 days ago
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Cool. This being an ARMv7 core will probably open up a lot of neat things. I wonder if the Xen ARM port will work on this...
Seattle
satadru
1951 days ago
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New Kodi box!
New York, NY
kazriko
1951 days ago
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This sort of makes the Pi interesting again. Just a bit. And windows 10 on it for free, huh?
Colorado Plateau

Here’s How to Turn on Chrome’s Mute Button for Obnoxious Audio Tabs - Say, for instance, if you have auto-playing ads that you can't find...

3 Comments and 14 Shares

4527990934_aecd198b6c_z

One of the handiest features of Google Chrome is the speaker icon that appears on any tab playing audio, but sometimes the offending page widget does too good a job hiding itself, and you don’t want to just close the whole tab. Prepare to have your Internet experience revolutionized: You can easily change that icon to a functional mute button.

lemonhighfive

All you have to do is click a button in Chrome’s hidden settings. You can navigate to the “Flags” settings page by putting “chrome://flags/#enable-tab-audio-muting” in the address bar. That’ll bring you right to the setting you’re looking for to ensure that your ears are never again affronted with repetitive ads for historically low mortgage rates.

Screen Shot 2015-02-02 at 10.35.38 AM

Click enable, restart your browser, and your eardrums are forever liberated! Now that little speaker icon will finally pull its weight. Just click it to mute.

Screen Shot 2015-02-02 at 10.51.08 AM

Fact: Dinosaurs are loud.

Google’s been reluctant to add such a feature officially, because they don’t want to be “policing content,” but now you know. And knowing is half the battle!

(via Gizmodo, image via Alex Berger)

Are you following The Mary Sue on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, & Google +?

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irunfrombears
1950 days ago
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This is the best thing ever
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1951 days ago
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RedSonja
1951 days ago
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Oh thank god
JoeTortuga
1951 days ago
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This is actually going to be useful on themarysue's page.
Columbus, Ohio

October 24, 2013

4 Comments and 25 Shares

POW!
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irunfrombears
2417 days ago
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For future reference
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2417 days ago
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carsonb
2417 days ago
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Teaching kids math through hands-on experimentation.
Peoria, Illinois
petrilli
2417 days ago
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Hah!
Arlington, VA
boredomfestival
2417 days ago
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Awesome

The official Dilbert website with Scott Adams' color comic strips, animation, mashups and more!

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The Official Dilbert Website featuring Scott Adams Dilbert strips, animations and more
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Send to a Friend or Friends

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tedder
2431 days ago
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this. is. me.
Uranus
irunfrombears
2430 days ago
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DC
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The "gourd pride movement"

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One of McSweeney's most popular online pieces is Colin Nissan's It's Decorative Gourd Season, Motherfuckers. Its sublime opening paragraph:

I don't know about you, but I can't wait to get my hands on some fucking gourds and arrange them in a horn-shaped basket on my dining room table. That shit is going to look so seasonal. I'm about to head up to the attic right now to find that wicker fucker, dust it off, and jam it with an insanely ornate assortment of shellacked vegetables. When my guests come over it's gonna be like, BLAMMO! Check out my shellacked decorative vegetables, assholes. Guess what season it is -- fucking fall. There's a nip in the air and my house is full of mutant fucking squash.

Nissan's piece is included in a new collection and has spawned a collectable mug. Here's a McSweeney's interview with Nissan about the piece and the "the whole gourd pride movement".

McSWEENEY'S: A large part of what makes "Gourds" so funny is the language. Use of F-bombs in humor is sometimes seen as a lazy way to get a reaction from the audience, but here it just works. How do you fucking explain this?

NISSAN: Fudge if I know. It's tricky because properly placed F-bombs really do have the power to work readers up into a lather, but they also have the power to make them think you're a juvenile idiot with a terrible vocabulary. For whatever reason, the swearing worked in this case. I think part of it was the fact that despite the language, the voice in the piece was never really angry or negative, he was just incredibly excited. If he was angry, I actually think the swearing might have turned people off.

Tags: Colin Nissan   interviews
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irunfrombears
2434 days ago
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Every fall I try to share this with as many people as possible.
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angelchrys
2434 days ago
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It really isn't fall for me until I've re-read It's Decorative Gourd Season, Motherfuckers. I wonder what that says about me.
Overland Park, KS
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